FUL Welcomes Decision to Remove Nomgcobo Jiba and Lawrence Mrwebi

26 April 2019

Freedom Under Law (FUL) believes that the decision of the President to remove Nomgcobo Jiba and Lawrence Mrwebi from their positions at the National Prosecuting Authority, in keeping with the recommendations contained in the report issued by the Mokgoro Enquiry, offers an opportunity for restoration of public confidence and trust in that embattled institution.

Under the leadership of new National Director of Public Prosecution (NDPP) Shamila Batohi, the NPA can today begin in earnest a process of rebuilding the institution, free of the corrupting influences of Ms Jiba and Mr Mrwebi. As the report of the Mokgoro Enquiry makes clear, not only were Ms Jiba and Mr Mrwebi found unfit to hold office but showed themselves not to have the integrity, conscientiousness and scrupulous honesty required of such senior officials in an institution so important to our constitutional democracy. 

As is evident from the report and other information publicly disclosed about the workings of the NPA during Ms Jiba and Mr Mrwebi’s time there, they were not the only officials responsible for wrongdoing. But they were central to the wrongdoing and in sidelining and in several instances persecuting those employees within the NPA intent on performing their constitutional operations, Jiba and Mrwebi’s corrupting influence was magnified. Freed of their presence, decent people in the NPA may now get on with their jobs and the tasks required by our Constitution.

FUL Concerned at Reports of Mass Surveillance of Law-Abiding Persons, Including its CEO

12 March 2019

According to a news report yesterday, the State Security Agency under the command of former President Zuma subjected numbers of private individuals to unlawful surveillance. These included Nicole Fritz, the Executive Officer of Freedom Under Law.


The suggestion that either Ms Fritz or FUL warranted surveillance is not only preposterous but profoundly disturbing. The pursuit of a perfectly law-abiding person and an equally respectable Rule of Law agency reflects an alarming level of paranoia among our securocrats. 


It also reveals a frightening lack of judgment and common-sense on the part of those entrusted with our national security if they cannot recognise the lawful activities of public-interest agencies such as Freedom Under Law. Beside all else, it represents an unforgivable wastage of resources.
Much more ominously, it reveals a deep-seated contempt for the Constitution and the human rights it guarantees.